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Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium L.): A systematic review

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Pharmacogn Rev. 2011 Jan-Jun; 5(9): 103–110.

doi: 10.4103/0973-7847.79105

Anil Pareek,Manish Suthar,1Garvendra S. Rathore,1 and Vijay Bansal

Abstract

Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium L.) (Asteraceae) is a medicinal plant traditionally used for the treatment of fevers, migraine headaches, rheumatoid arthritis, stomach aches, toothaches, insect bites, infertility, and problems with menstruation and labor during childbirth. The feverfew herb has a long history of use in traditional and folk medicine, especially among Greek and early European herbalists. Feverfew has also been used for psoriasis, allergies, asthma, tinnitus, dizziness, nausea, and vomiting. The plant contains a large number of natural products, but the active principles probably include one or more of the sesquiterpene lactones known to be present, including parthenolide. Other potentially active constituents include flavonoid glycosides and pinenes. It has multiple pharmacologic properties, such as anticancer, anti-inflammatory, cardiotonic, antispasmodic, an emmenagogue, and as an enema for worms. In this review, we have explored the various dimensions of the feverfew plant and compiled its vast pharmacologic applications to comprehend and synthesize the subject of its potential image of multipurpose medicinal agent. The plant is widely cultivated to large regions of the world and its importance as a medicinal plant is growing substantially with increasing and stronger reports in support of its multifarious therapeutic uses.

Keywords: Anti-inflammatory, migraine, parthenolide, Tanacetum parthenium

INTRODUCTION

Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium L.) belonging to the family Asteraceae (daisies) is a daisy-like perennial plant found commonly in gardens and along roadsides. The name stems from the Latin word febrifugia, “fever reducer.” The first-century Greek physician Dioscorides prescribed feverfew for “all hot inflammations.” Also known as “featherfew,” because of its feathery leaves.[13] It is a short, bushy, aromatic perennial that grows 0.3–1 m in height. Its yellow-green leaves are usually less than 8 cm in length, almost hairless, and pinnate–bipinnate (chrysanthemum-like). Its yellow flowers bloom from July to October, are about 2 cm in diameter. They resemble those of chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla), for which they are sometimes confused, and have a single layer of white outer-ray florets.[46] This aromatic plant gives off a strong and bitter odor. Its yellow-green leaves are alternate (in other words the leaves grow on both sides of the stem at alternating levels), and turn downward with short hairs. The small, daisy-like yellow flowers are arranged in a dense flat-topped cluster

Feverfew – LIFE FORCE HEALTH CENTER

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3210009/

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